Now Playing Tracks

evoland2:

The Past

The story of Evoland 2 will take you through (mainly) 3 different time periods, each with its own historical setting and art style. Today we’ll have a look at the past, which is visually inspired by the good old NES era (with some more modern twists).

Our goal for the past is to create an ambivalent world where there is no clear bad or good guys. We’ve written a story in a war-torn world where every character has his own ambitions and the definition of good or bad is really a question of perspective.

You will be embark in a series of events related to the war between the Empire and the Demons, that will have a very deep impact on the evolution of the world and the other eras (we’ll cover these in other posts).

We use these events to tell a story that you can piece together in different ways. For example you will be able to witness an event directly in the past or find a record of them in the present or future, and more often than not, doing both will be the only way to have a clear perspective of what is really happening.

For a more literary description of the period, we’ll leave it to fabled scholar Sagamundus the Young (from the introduction of his bestseller The Dominion War: Cultural and Political Impact on Agrarian Urbanism):

Nobody knows who really started the war, but the world became a dangerous place, forcing people to hide in villages and cities while armies and bandits roam the land.

Arthus, the king of the demons, struggled to maintain unity within a fledging demon army, following rumors of the powerful magical weapon built by the Empire. He needed to rally his troops and hope for a victorious last stand.

The Emperor seemed to be slowly winning the war, but the High Priest of the Magi clearly had a hidden agenda, as did professor Giro, the strange and reclusive man behind the development of the Weapon.

With so many factions vying for power within the Empire itself, it was impossible at the time to know who would truly emerge victorious…

We make Tumblr themes